Wave Engineering sets a world record!

Wave Engineering sets a world record!

Okay, so maybe we’re just assuming it’s a world record! Nonetheless, Wave Engineering just completed a FERC pipeline environmental noise assessment in one week….from start to finish in seven days.  That’s right, a complete assessment of construction noise on over ten miles of new natural gas pipeline meeting the requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  We determined the daytime and nighttime ambient sound levels for Noise Sensitive Areas (NSAs) and predicted the noise impact on each NSA.  A written report was submitted in accordance with FERC guidelines. A noise assessment like this will normally take about three weeks.  We don’t recommend that you wait until the last minute, but we understand that sometimes you find yourself with a very tight schedule.  Give us a call and we’ll do everything we can to help.  If it can be done, we’ll get it done....
Did you see the bridge move?

Did you see the bridge move?

Congratulations to the CDOT, Wilson & Company, and Kiewit Infrastructure team on the I-70 & Pecos Street bridge project in Denver!   Construction continues but the new bridge was moved into place last weekend in front of 1,000 onlookers. Wave Engineering provided the construction noise assessment and acoustical engineering required by the City of Denver to grant a nighttime noise variance and allow the project to move forward. Watch this CDOT video of the move.    Still photo credit:  Sky Photo, Inc. (www.Skyphoto.com)  – Low altitude aerial photo taken from remote controlled...
The Magic of Noise Contours

The Magic of Noise Contours

Wouldn’t it be great if you could wave a magic wand and your client could “see” new equipment and its noise levels before a single piece of equipment is installed?  Imagine a colorful illustration which clearly delineates scenarios and solutions.  This post shows just a couple of examples. It’s not magic, but in the hands of a qualified acoustical engineer, the noise prediction software CadnaA might appear that way. Noise contours are lines that connect sound levels like elevations on a topo map.  The contours can be overlaid on satellite photos, site plans, local maps, photos, etc., to show the predicted sound levels from one or many noise sources in an accurate, highly visual way.     Noise maps are most powerful when used to show noise from facilities with many sources – such as power plants, gas compressor stations, roof top mechanical units on a school or high-rise residence, etc.   They are also often seen in conjunction with airport runways.  It is easy to evaluate multiple options for mitigation. A graphic representation of noise levels is highly effective in public meetings, hearings, or in management presentations when various scenarios are being discussed. Intrigued?  Call Wave Engineering for a demonstration and watch the...